Dylann Roof Heads To Death Row

Dylann Roof Heads To Death Row

Dylann Roof was sentenced to death by US federal justice for the murder of nine black parishioners of a church in South Carolina in 2015 and received a nine-year prison sentence on Monday.

These new sentences result from a sentencing procedure that allowed the parties to avoid a harsh second trial.

They are in addition to the death sentence already imposed in January on the young man, after a trial in which he never expressed regrets about his killing. It had shocked beyond the borders of the United States.

In America, murderers are generally tried by states, but federal authorities may also decide to prosecute an accused for particularly serious crimes. Federal capital punishments remain scarce.

23-year-old Dylann Roof appeared on Monday in Charleston (southeast of the country) in an audience for video debates.

In a sluggish voice and always showing the same hair cut in the bowl that gives him a childish air, he confirmed pleading guilty to his murders. The families of his victims were able to express themselves for the last time. The judge then announced the sentences negotiated with the prosecutors.

Dylann Roof is escorted into the court room at the Charleston County Judicial Center in Charleston, South Carolina, April 10, 2017. Grace Beahm/Pool / Reuters
Dylann Roof is escorted into the court room at the Charleston County Judicial Center in Charleston, South Carolina, April 10, 2017. Grace Beahm/Pool / Reuters

Roof Moved To Death Row

Roof is now on death row, reports, NBC News.

Prison records show Roof resides at the United States Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana as of Saturday morning. Terre Haute, a medium-security prison where inmates are put to death by lethal injection, currently houses 1,338 inmates.

On June 17, 2015, after careful preparation, Dylann Roof claimed to attend a catechism session at the Emanuel Church in Charleston, before opening fire 77 times on the assembly.

Dylan Roof, convinced of the supremacy of whites over the other races he considers inferior, will never have sought to alleviate his crimes.

“I didn’t have to do it. But what I meant when I said that was that I felt that I had to do it. And I still feel that I had to do it.”  – Dylann Roof

The shooting he had perpetrated had all the more marked the public opinion that it had bloodied a church symbol of the black struggle against slavery.

Since his criminal case before the South Carolina courts is now closed, Dylann Roof will soon be transferred to the federal penitentiary. He should be detained in another state, possibly years before being executed.

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