dog attack in liverpool: Girl, 2, seriously injured

dog attack in liverpool: Girl, 2, seriously injured

 

According to media reports Monday, a two-year-old girl was seriously injured in a vicious dog attack after several dogs got into a propertywhere she was playing, police said.

The girl’s aunt screamed “the dog’s got the baby” as her niece was attacked.

The toddler suffered head and body injuries during the attack in Toxteth, Liverpool, police said.

Her aunt, who was also looking after two other children, fought off the dogs and carried the child away as neighbours ran to help.

As reported my Metro, a 35-year-old man from Toxteth has been arrested on suspicion of having a dangerous dog/dogs out of control.

Emergency services were called to the house at about 3.40pm after reports a child had been bitten by a dog and a woman had also been injured.

Chief Inspector Dave Westby said: ‘This was a horrific attack which has resulted in a two-year-old girl suffering extensive injuries to her head and body.

‘The investigation is in its early stages, but it is believed that the child was playing in the back garden of a relative’s address with two other children, aged four and six, when a number of dogs from a nearby house managed to get in to the garden.

The girl was treated at the scene before being taken by air ambulance to Alder Hey Children’s Hospital.

in 2015, laws were introduced to enable police, council officials and social housing landlords to issue community protection notices, or “dogbos”, to force the owners of nuisance animals to take steps to control their behaviour.

In theory the latter measures should help prevent attacks. But the Dogs Trust said there was little evidence of the dogbo being widely utilised so far. The charity’s head of public affairs said: “From what we are hearing, it’s not being used or it’s not being used properly.”

Veterinary charity the People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA) also said prevention was key.

A spokeswoman said: “Careful socialisation and training of puppies when young is vital to ensure well-rounded and confident adult dogs, rather than those displaying problem behaviours and aggression in later life. Ensuring pet owners fully understand their pet’s needs is crucial.

“It is also important that young children are aware of how to behave safely around pets, and to ensure they are never left unattended with dogs.”

There were wide regional variations in hospital admissions for dog bites or attacks, with the highest rate in Merseyside (27 per 100,000 people) and the lowest in Kent and Medway (7.3 per 100,000), although these figures may reflect regional variations in dog ownership, according to the government’s Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC).

Police close the road in Cockburn Street in Toxteth, Liverpool, after a two-year-old girl was seriously injured after being attacked by dogs in the garden of a house in Liverpool. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday May 7, 2017. Merseyside Police said the toddler suffered serious injuries to her head and body in the attack, after dogs managed to get into the garden of the house where she was playing. See PA story POLICE Dog. Photo credit should read: Peter Byrne/PA Wire
Police close the road in Cockburn Street in Toxteth, Liverpool, after a two-year-old girl was seriously injured after being attacked by dogs in the garden of a house in Liverpool. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday May 7, 2017. Merseyside Police said the toddler suffered serious injuries to her head and body in the attack, after dogs managed to get into the garden of the house where she was playing. See PA story POLICE Dog. Photo credit should read: Peter Byrne/PA Wire

The rate of admissions for dog bites was between two and three times as high for the most deprived areas (1,251 admissions, 24.4 per 100,000 population) as for the least deprived areas (448 admissions, 8.5 per 100,000).

A spokesman for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) pointed to the changes to the law made last year, adding: “Any dog can become dangerous if it is brought up in the wrong environment and we are working with vets, animal welfare and owner groups to promote dog welfare and responsible ownership.

“Changes to the DDA introduced last year have enabled the police and local councils to take stronger action and we are working closely with them on enforcement issues such as giving warning notices to owners if their dogs are not under proper control in a public place or on private property.”

Recent deaths caused by dogs have included:

Jade Anderson, 14 – Jade suffered horrific injuries “from head to toe” after being attacked by two bull mastiffs and two Staffordshire bull terriers while alone at a friend’s house in Wigan, Greater Manchester, in March 2013.

No prosecution could be brought under the DDA at the time because the dogs were not banned breeds and were not out of control in a public place.

Clifford Clarke, 79 – Clarke was attacked in his garden in Clubmoor, Liverpool by his next-door neighbour’s Presa Canario crossbreed dog, which had not been fed for 45 hours, in May 2013.

Sentencing Clarke’s neighbours – Hayley Sulley, 30, and Della Woods, 29 – to a year each in jail, Judge Mark Brown said Clarke’ was “literally eaten alive”.

Lexi Branson, 4 – Lexi was mauled by her family’s pet bulldog at her mother’s flat in Mountsorrel, Leicestershire in November 2013.

Her mother, Jodi Hudson, was forced to stab the rescue dog, which had been with the family for just two months, with a kitchen knife in an attempt to save her daughter and halt the sustained attack.

Emma Bennett, 27 – Bennett was pregnant when attacked by the family’s two pitbull-type dogs at her home in Leeds in December 2013. She suffered severe injuries to her face and head.

Her partner, Lee Horner, 34, was given a community order and told to do 280 hours of unpaid work after admitting that he owned dogs prohibited by the DDA.

Eliza-Mae Mullane, 6 days – Eliza was killed when she was snatched from her pram by her family’s pet dog at their home in Pontyberem, near Llanelli in south Wales in February last year and suffered serious head injuries.

The family had two dogs – a husky-like Alaskan malamute and a terrier – but it was not disclosed which was responsible. Neither had caused any problems previously and a coroner judged the death to be an accident.

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