Confederate Memorial Day: New Orleans Begins Removing Confederate Monuments

Confederate Memorial Day: New Orleans Begins Removing Confederate Monuments

The municipality of New Orleans , Louisiana, began dismantling the four monuments built between 1884 and 1915 to the glory of Confederation.

the city has dismantled the statues of General Robert E. Lee, P. G. T. Beauregard, Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy during the Civil War obelisk and dedicated to the Battle of Liberty Place (1874), reports the New York Times.

The municipality joins communities that have decided to be taken to the Confederate monuments considered symbols of slavery, racism and intolerance.

“The removal of these statues sends a clear and unequivocal message to the people of New Orleans and the nation: New Orleans celebrates our diversity, inclusion and tolerance,” Mr. Landrieu said. “This is not about politics, blame or retaliation. This is not a naïve quest to solve all our problems at once. This is about showing the whole world that we as a city and as a people are able to acknowledge, understand, reconcile — and most importantly — choose a better future.”

Death threats

The massacre of nine Negroes on June 17, 2015 in Charleston, South Carolina, in a church by a young white supremacist wearing the Confederate flag, revived the debate in the United States on the red-white-blue banner at thirteen stars. In July 2015, this southeastern state of the United States decided to withdraw it from the local parliament. In August 2016, the Jefferson Davis statue was removed from the University of Texas campus in Austin.

City mayor Mitch Landrieu announced that the dismantling was to begin in the night of Sunday to Monday, at night, due to death threats and intimidation from extremists. About thirty people demonstrated in the night near the Jefferson Davis statue.

“The removal of these statues sends a clear and unequivocal message to the people of New Orleans and the nation: New Orleans celebrates our diversity, inclusion and tolerance,” Mr. Landrieu said. “This is not about politics, blame or retaliation. This is not a naïve quest to solve all our problems at once. This is about showing the whole world that we as a city and as a people are able to acknowledge, understand, reconcile — and most importantly — choose a better future.”

Share this post