Titanic Locket Found Belonging To Virginia Estelle McDowell Clark (PHOTO)

Titanic Locket Found Belonging To Virginia Estelle McDowell Clark (PHOTO)

TORONTO – A locket collected from the ocean floor belonged to a real passenger, whose story of love and loss could rival James Cameron’s classic.

Gambling chips, a locket, and a cuff link are just a few of the items found in a suitcase that belonged to first-class passenger Virginia Estelle McDowell Clark and her husband Walter Miller Clark, who traveled aboard the Titanic on her maiden voyage. The items and the story of the husband and wife will be on display for a limited time at the The Artifact Exhibition inside the Luxor Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas in recognition of the 105th anniversary of the ship’s sinking on April 15, 1912.

The Clarks were on a belated honeymoon in Europe when they decided to book a trip on the Titanic so they could come home early to be with their two-year-old son on his birthday, according to Alexandra Klingelhofer, vice president of collections for Premier Exhibitions, Inc.

“Sadly, Virginia survived and Walter did not,” Klingelhofer said.

(Photo: Premier Exhibitions Inc.)
(Photo: Premier Exhibitions Inc.)

Virginia Clark later said that when she felt the iceburg hit the boat, her husband was playing poker in the saloon, so she interrupted the game and told him she thought something was wrong, Klingelhofer said.

Walter left the game and ultimately helped his wife into lifeboat four.

“The boat was supposed to lower and gather more passengers, but couldn’t take passengers from the gangway door, so it continued being lowered,” Klingelhofer said. “There was quite a bit of room on the boat, so there would have been a spot for [Mr. Clark] if it had worked out differently.”

The Clarks’ story and other items from the Titanic will be on display on April 12 at Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition inside Las Vegas’ Luxor Hotel and Casino ahead of the 105th anniversary of the ship’s sinking on April 15, 1912.

Klingelhofer said she has a rewarding task of looking at pieces closely and seeing if she can find ways to identify where they came from, where they were made and who they belonged to.

“It’s a very rewarding task and it allows me to contribute also to the legacy of Titanic in a personal way,” she said.

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